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Taiyin Daquanji  ToC   Folio 5 ToC   /   Other melody lists 網站目錄
Taiyin Daquanji 1
Folio 5, End: Introduction plus Modal Preludes and Melody Lists
Explanations provided by the translator are put either in brackets ( ) or in footnotes.2
太音大全集
琴操辨議、調意、曲調

Qin Cao Bian Yi 3 (Discerning the Significance of Qin Melodies), by Yuan Junzhe 4 (I/102)

The qin melodies transmitted to society can be divided into (three) different types, Jiang melodies, Min (Fujian) melodies and Zhe melodies....

 
(Translation not yet complete. On line 7 of the essay Yuan Junzhe talks about traveling north and south. The essay ends)

 

均折識....information from (Yuan) Junzhe."

 
(Qin tablature in Taiyin Daquanji 5 [the lists below and my own transcriptions are both based on the Yuan volume text6]:
  Five modal preludes7 [#s 1, 13, 32, 35 and 44 below]; recordings are now online, but not my transcriptions.8)

  1. Gong Yi (tablature [compare 1425], then the following list of melodies9; I/102)

  2. Meihua Sannong (1425)
  3. Shenpin Gong Yi (1425)
  4. Xiuxi Yin (1525; compare Liu Shang and Jiu Kuang)
  5. Yang Chun (1425; see Bai Xue below)
  6. Xiaoyao Yin (1525)
  7. Xiaoyao You (1525)
  8. Guanghan You (1425)
  9. Gukou Yin (1525)
  10. Chonghe Yin (1525)
  11. Huai Gu Yin (1525)
  12. Feng Lei Yin (1539)

  13. Shang Yi (tablature [compare 1425], then the following list of melodies10; I/102)

  14. Xing Tan Yin (1525)
  15. Yasheng Cao (1511)
  16. Si Xian Cao (<1491)
  17. He Ming Jiu Gao (1425)
  18. Yuan He Shuang Qing (1511)
  19. Wang Huang He (望黃鶴 14997.xxx Gazing at Yellow Crane [Pavilion?])
  20. Chang Qing (1425)
  21. Duan Qing (1425)
  22. Chang Ce (1525)
  23. Duan Ce (1525)
  24. Wang Ji (1425)
  25. Bai Xue (1425; see Yang Chun above)
  26. Fei Pei Yin (1590)
  27. Qi Qi (1525)
  28. Mei Shao Yue (1525)
  29. Chun Jiang (1539 and 1525)
  30. Guanghan Qiu (1425)
  31. Yun Zhu Ji (雲竹偈 ; compare Yun Zhu Ta)
    "Yi Ming Qiu Shui" (一名秋水 "also called Qiu Shui"? Written here as though a separate title)

  32. Jiao Yi (tablature [compare 1425], then the following list of melodies11; I/102)

  33. Lingxu Yin (1425)
  34. Yu Feng (1425)

  35. Zhi Yi (tablature [compare 1425], then the following list of melodies12; I/102)

  36. Hui Tong Yin (會通吟, compare 會同引 in 1525)
  37. Tu Shan (1425)
  38. Shuang Ye Hong (1525)
  39. Qiu Ye Wen Zhen (秋夜聞砧 On an Autumn Evening Hearing the Stone: like Dao Yi?)
  40. Long Gui Wan Dong (1525)
  41. Yan Guo Hengyang (1539)
  42. Shan Ju Yin (1425)
  43. Qiao Ge (1425)

  44. Yu Yi (tablature [compare 1425], then the following list of melodies13; I/102)

  45. He Wu Dongtian (1525)
  46. Zhi Zhao Fei (1425)
  47. Yushu Lin Feng (1525)
  48. Wu Ye Ti (1425)
  49. Pei Lan (1539)

  50. Huangzhong Yi (see 1425; no tablature, only the following list of melodies)

  51. Huangyun Qiusai (1425)
  52. Da Ya (1425)
  53. Yi Guan Shan (1525 has it as a prelude for Han Gong Qiu, also called Qiu Shan Yin)
  54. Qiuhu (presumably Qiuhu Xing, but could it be a misprint for Qiushan?: see previous entry)
  55. Zhaojun Yuan (1425)

  56. Qiliang Yi (see 1425; no tablature, only the following list of melodies)

  57. Chu Ge (1425)
  58. Shenpin Chushang Diao (1425)
  59. Zepan Yin (1425)
  60. Li Sao (1425)

  61. Shenpin Wuyi Yi14 (see 1425; no tablature, only the following list of melodies)

  62. Yong Qing Yin (永清吟 17461.142xxx [yongqing: clear for a distance; place name])
  63. Da Hujia (1425)

  64. Ruibin Yi (see 1425; no tablature, only the following list of melodies)

  65. Fan Canglang (1425)
  66. Shui Yun (1425)

  67. Guxian Yi (see 1425; no tablature, only the following list of melodies)

  68. Feiming Yin (1425)
  69. Qiu Hong (1425)

  70. Fugu Kaizhi (復古開指 see 1525 Fugu Yi: these use same tuning as Huangzhong and Wuyi, but only 5 strings)
  71. Lishan Yin (歷山吟 1525)
  72. Nanfeng Chang (not 1525 [standard tuning] but 1551)

Taiyin Daquanji then ends with a preface attributed to Zhu Quan, used here as an afterword.

 
Footnotes (Shorthand references are explained on a separate page)

1. From Qinqu Jicheng, new series, pp. 102-3
(Return)

2. Explanations by translator
See comments concerning the structure of the original text.
(Return)

3. 琴操辨議
(Return)

4. 袁均哲 Yuan Junzhe
(Return)

5. The other example of modal preludes apparently published in the Song dynasty are those in qin section of Shilin Guangji.
(Return)

6. Three of the four surviving editions (all but YJZTGYY) have here tablature for each of the five modes using standard tuning. Each prelude is followed by a list naming melodies in that mode. After this are the names of several modes and melodies using non-standard tuning. QFTGYY (see again editions) is copied exactly from the Yuan volume, but there are some significant differences in the tablature and melody lists between the Yuan volume and the Zhu volume. Comparing the two, the Yuan volume (QQJC, New Series, pp. 102d/3) seems to be more reliable than the Zhu volume (QQJC Original Series, pp. 67/8). The melody lists are almost the same (the Zhu volume omits one gong mode title and has Wuyi Yi instead of Shenpin Wuyi Yi), but there are tablature differences in each of the five preludes. The differences do not suggest that one volume was correcting the other, so it is most likely that both simply copied mistakes from a still earlier volume. None of the tablature mentions harmonics, but both the gong and shang modal preludes seem to end with a phrase in harmonics.
(Return)

7. Transcriptions and recordings from Taiyin Daquanji
My work reconstructing the music in Taiyin Daquanji, leading up to the transcriptions and recordings, suggests that the tablature is less complete and has more mistakes than does the tablature for preludes in Shilin Guangji. This makes interpreting these five more problematic. For more on modes see Modality in early Ming Qin tablature.
(Return)

8. Modal Preludes (調意 Diao yi)
Compare diao yi with kaizhi.
(Return)

9. Gong Yi in Taiyin Daquanji         (I/102; Listen to my recording 聽我的錄音)
There are minor tablature differences between the Yuan and Zhu volumes. Other than the opening phrase, a number of passages resemble phrases in 1425 Shenpin Gong Yi, including the last four notes. These four notes should probably be played in harmonics, but this is not indicated. Comparing the melody lists, the Zhu volume is missing Xiaoyao Yin. Compare also Gong Diao.
(Return)

10. Shang Yi in Taiyin Daquanji         (I/102; Listen to my recording 聽我的錄音)
There are a few tablature differences between the Yuan and Zhu volumes, with the Yuan seeming more reliable. The prelude has some phrases found in the 1425 Shenpin Shang Yi, including several flatted mi, a characteristic commonly found in shang mode melodies surviving in early Ming tablature. The melody lists are identical. The last six notes should probably be played in harmonics, but this is not indicated. Compare also
Shang Diao.
(Return)

11. Jiao Yi in Taiyin Daquanji         (I/102; Listen to my recording 聽我的錄音)
There are a few tablature differences between the Yuan and Zhu volumes, with the Yuan seeming more reliable. The melody lists are identical. Jiao mode preludes and melodies generally have gong as the primary tonal center, with the open 3rd string (called jiao) being gong (see Shenpin Jiao Yi and chart). But here the main note throughout is yu (the open 7th string is yu) right until the very last note, which is suddenly gong (gou the 3rd string with the ring finger in the 7th position). The effect is rather strange, though this is somewhat diminished if this last note is played in harmonics. Compare also Jiao Diao.
(Return)

12. Zhi Yi in Taiyin Daquanji         (I/102; Listen to my recording 聽我的錄音)
There are a few tablature differences between the Yuan and Zhu volumes, with both having some obvious mistakes. This is the only one of the five preludes not to begin "tiao the open 7th string; gou the 4th string stopped in the 9th position; repeat". However, later zhi modal preludes do begin with that pattern, and the 1425 Shenpin Zhi Yi contains several phrases found also here in Zhi Yi, so I have added the opening passage to my own transcription. The tuning here seems to be treated as 5 6 1 2 3 5 6 instead of 1 2 4 5 6 1 2 (see comment under Shenpin Zhi Yi). The two melody lists are identical. Compare also Zhi Diao.
(Return)

13. Yu Yi in Taiyin Daquanji         (I/102; Listen to my recording 聽我的錄音)
There are several tablature differences between the Yuan and Zhu volumes, with the Zhu volume omitting an 11 note passage found in the Yuan volume. (The omitted passage begins with the same four clusters as the following phrase, suggesting the omission is a mistake). The modal characteristics are similar to those of later yu mode melodies, but the prelude here does not have any notable phrases found in the 1425 Shenpin Yu Yi. The two melody lists are identical. Compare also Yu Diao.
(Return)

14. Shenpin Wuyi Yi
The Zhu volume has only "Wuyi Yi".
(Return)

Return to Melody Lists
Taiyin Daquanji index page
to the annotated handbook list
or to the Guqin ToC.