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FXXP  Wenjun Cao commentary
Song for Wenjun
<I>Wenjun Cao</I>: <A HREF="../../../06hear/fxxp/fx27wjcfr.mp3"><I>Wenjun Cao</I></A> 聽第二 Listen to a second version 1   /   首頁
My staff notation shows only relative pitch: thus the first note is not "C" but "do" (actual pitch here between Bb & B♮)  

 
Footnotes (Shorthand references are explained on a
separate page)

1. Second version: Two methods of singing
On the second recording I sing in unison with the qin; in the first the relationship between qin and voice is more free. Here the idea is that an essential characteristic of qin music is the colors from playing with silk strings. Unison play tends to obscure this more than free accompaniment. In addition Chinese traditional ensemble music, until the invention of the modern Chinese orchestra, tended always to be heterophonic.

This traditional melody was the source of my new piece, Lovebirds (also recorded, but without voice).
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