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ZCZZ   in the ToC   /   Birds 首頁
Wild Geese on the Frontier
Zhi mode: here 2 3 5 6 7 2 3 2
 
塞上鴻 1
Saishang Hong
A wild goose soars 3        
The earliest surviving publication of this melody dates from
1589 (reprinted in 1609); after this it survives in at least 32 more handbooks from 1647 to 1914;4 of these at least 12 have commentary.5 The 1589 preface, repeated in a number of these later editions (either verbatim or in paraphrase) even when the music is quite different, says that the melody was written to lament the barbarian border regions, adding that this makes the theme comparable to that of the melody Yellow Clouds of Autumn at the Frontier.6 The preface then describes a border scene, bleak everywhere, eyes filled with dust and haze, winds chilling the bones. Above this in the blue firmament wild geese soar, calling out "liao li" and thus evoking the phrase, "The king's business never ends, (so) I do not have the leisure to return home." At least one later handbook is more specific about the person in the border regions, saying the melody was created by Su Wu,7 (ca. 140 - 60 BC) a Han ambassador famously detained by the Xiongnu; while forced to work as a shepherd in the desert he is said to have sent a message home by tying it to the foot of a goose.

Some of the later handbooks also comment on the melody itself, which is quite remarkable for its chromatic passages, not to mention non-pentatonic notes. This chromaticism may well be related to the borderland theme.8 However, it creates many problems of interpretation, as the positions of many of the potentially non-pentatonic notes are written with some ambiguity.9 It should be pointed out here that these ambiguously written notes are mostly notes that seem often to characterize zhi mode melodies of this period.10 There may be some uncertainty about the names for these notes (see below), but the present discussion is based on considering the relative tuning to be 2 3 5 6 7 2 3, putting the melody into a la - mi mode: the scale is 6 1 2 3 5 and the note 1 is often sharped.11 (Note that Yellow Clouds of Autumn at the Frontier is also a la - mi mode melody.)

With the tuning considered as 2 3 5 6 7 2 3 it can be seen that it is the note 1 or 1 sharp that is most often written unclearly, and my inability to find patterns or consistency in the usage often makes it difficult to remember which note in such a passage should be 1 and which 1 sharp. If there are modal rules for this then perhaps by playing the notes precisely as written one might learn and internalize these. However, it is also possible that these altered notes are there simply to provide unexpected colors; in this case performers might justifiably feel free to make their own decisions about when to play 1 or 1 sharp, based on their own mood.

Two other characteristics that complicate reconstruction are some of the seemingly awkward fingerings,12 and some apparently conflicting instructions.13

Although Saishang Hong eventually became a very popular melody, surviving as mentioned in 33 handbooks to 1914, the next editions after the 1589 original (not counting the 1609 reprint) did not appear until 164714 and then 1670 (the latter had two versions15). The 1647 version and the first one in 1670 are both quite different from the 1589 tablature, but the second version dated 1670 is very similar to that of 1589. The fourth handbook is Chengjiantang Qinpu, published in 1689;16 from here until 1914 the melody appears quite regularly, apparently with quite a bit of variety.

At present there seem to have been two reconstructions (published?):

  1. Around 1980 Wu Jinglue is said to have reconstructed the version from Wuzhizhai Qinpu (1722), but I do not know of any recordings of this.17
  2. Hammond YungYouTube); its source seems to be 1870.18

My own reconstruction is written out in staff notation but not yet recorded.

The source of this melody is not at all clear. At the front of the earliest tablature, for the 1589 edition, is the statement "Revised by Zheng Yangju of Jinling (Nanjing) and transmitted".19 This suggests the melody was already in the active repertoire at that time. Then the 1609 edition changes "transmitted" to four smaller characters that mean "transmitted from Korea".20 This rather dramatic statement does not seem to be repeated elsewhere.

However, the editor of Lü Hua (1833) writes that Saishang Hong sounds like northern Kunqu.21 He mentions the claim of an association with Korea, but thinks this was probably added for its exotic appeal, and perhaps also to disguise the fact that it was actually in a style of Kunqu, one associated with a particular opera writer.22

 
Original Preface23

It is thought that this melody was written as a lament on the barbarian border regions. Comparable to Yellow Clouds of Autumn at the Frontier....
(Translation incomplete: see summary)

 
Melody
13 Sections; no subtitles or lyrics
24
   

 
Footnotes (Shorthand references are explained on a separate page)

1. Saishang Hong 塞上鴻 (VII/169)
The Chinese does not specify number, so the title could also be translated as "Wild Goose on the Frontier", or "Wild Frontier Goose". This would be particularly appropriate if the thought is of a goose taking a message home.

5426.xxx; 5426.86 塞鴻 sai hong: geese on frontier (poems by Bai Juyi), or a messenger between a man and woman (唐王仙客故事);
2/1184 塞鴻 saihong says the messenger story was inspired by that of Su Wu on the frontier (see Han Jie Cao, and note that 1893 attributes the melody to Su Wu);
References: 周德清﹕長江萬里白如練,淮山數點青如澱。江帆幾片疾如箭,山泉千尺飛如電。 晚云都變露,新月初學扇,塞鴻一字來如線。
plus 白居易﹕晚秋夜﹕碧空溶溶月華靜,月里愁人吊孤影。花開殘菊傍疏籬叶,葉下衰桐落寒井。 塞鴻飛急覺秋盡,鄰雞鳴遲知夜永。 凝情不語空所思,風吹白露衣裳冷。
and 贈江客詩﹕江柳影寒新雨地,塞鴻聲急欲霜天。愁君獨向沙頭宿,水繞蘆花月滿船。芦花月满船。
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2. Zhi mode (徵音 zhi yin, elsewhere called 徵調 zhi diao)
According to my interpretation, Saishang Hong is said to be in zhi mode because the tonal center is on the equivalent of the open fourth string, called "zhi"; however, this note seems to be played as la (6). The selection of which note to call "la" (or do, 1) in any particular melody is not always immediately clear. Theory may dictate this according to the mode, but the best test is to play the melody for traditional musicians who can sing solfeggio and see what they sing as do (more comment). By this standard, in Shen Qi Mi Pu the zhi mode tuning seems best considered as 1 2 4 5 6 1 2 ; elsewhere sometimes 4 5 7b 1 2 4 5 seems appropriate. However, what seems to work best here is 2 3 5 6 7 2 3. For the more typical zhi mode characteristics see Shenpin Zhi Yi (including the la - mi considerations) and in Modality in early Ming qin tablature. See also Comments on the modality below, which reveal an early awareness that the melody avoids the open fifth string (it also generally avoids the stopped notes and harmonic notes equivalent to it).

Further regarding 2 3 5 6 7 2 3, observe that the ambiguous note, 1 or 1 sharp, has no open string. Note also that a sharped 1 in la - mi modes is not uncommon in the early qin repertoire. See, for example, comments under Shenpin Wuyi Yi.
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3. Illustration
Image from the internet (section of 2nd image on page) - appropriate classical illustration not found yet. Here and in other literary references, although the skies may be grey along the horizon, overhead they can be blue. Here the goose flying in the 青霄 blue firmament perhaps reminds the observer of home not just because the geese can fly there but because the skies at home are also blue.
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4. Tracing Saishang Hong (also see tracing chart below)
Zha Guide 29/232/--; none of the handbooks has lyrics or section titles. The earliest surviving version is the one in the 1589 edition of Boya Xinfa, part of Zhenchuan Zhengzong Qinpu. In 1609 the general title of the handbook was changed to Qinpu Hebi; here Saishang Hong is the first melody in the second folio of Boya Xinfa. Zha's list does not include Bei Saishang Hong or Nan Saishang Hong, related melodies found only in 1760. The second version of 1670 seems largely to copy 1589; the others seem all to have substantial melodic and modal differences. The prefaces mostly repeat that of 1589, with the most detailed musical commentary in 1833 (see below).
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5. Prefaces and afterwords to Saishang Hong
The attached is a pdf file with all this original commentary as copied out in Zha Fuxi's Guide, pp. 232-4.
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6. Comparison with Yellow Clouds of Autumn at the Frontier
Although there is no apparent melodic connection between these two melodies, both seem to have characteristics of a la - mi mode. (Most early guqin melodies seem either to have do as their primary tonal center and sol as their secondary tonal center [do - sol mode] or la as their primary tonal center and mi as the secondary tonal center [la - mi mode]. It is interesting to compare these modes with the Western major and minor modes.)
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7. Su Wu theme
There seems to be only handbook making this connection to Su Wu, Kumu Chan Qinpu (1893). However, in addition to the preface below, see also the footnote above, which suggests that "sai hong" can also evoke the image of a bird carrying a message home from the frontier, thus indirectly evoking the Su Wu story.
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8. Comments on the modality of Saishang Hong
The first comment on the modality seems to be the brief note under the title with the first tablature of 1670, where at front it says, "忌散五絃 Avoid the open 5th string." This seems to be a command rather than a statement of fact, and at the end of Section 2 it expands on this by stating that, although the equivalent of this note is clearly indicated in the preceding harmonic passage, that note really shouldn't be there. It adds, however, that since the tablature was "楊師較遍 an edition revised by Master Yang", a lowly disciple such as the present writer could not change it. In fact, there are several places later in the piece where in the 1589 version this note does appear, but which in 1670 version 1 it seems always to be raised half a pitch, giving a strange effect even for this piece.

Although the 1589 version also generally avoids this note, it is there clearly in the opening (once) and closing (four times) harmonic passages and is specifically indicated in a few other places (in particular on the 5th position of the 7th string - changed to 4.8 in 1670/#1). In other places it is generally a passing tone and sometimes might be interpreted as a different note. The implications of all this are discussed further above; see also the note count below.
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9. Ambiguous notes
The tablature here does not use the modern decimal system of writing finger positions, which dates only from the end of the Ming dynasty, and because Saishang Hong has many non-pentatonic notes clearly indicated, care must be used when trying to interpret notes which may be ambiguous. Potential ambiguities in the earlier system are discussed in some detail elsewhere on this site (see, e.g., Determining the notes). As discussed there and elsewhere, if the old system is used carefully, as apparently it was in Shen Qi Mi Pu, there need be no more ambiguity in the old system than in the new. However, the present handbook is not as precisely written as Shen Qi Mi Pu. This, compounded with the numerous non-pentatonic notes clearly indicated, makes it often very difficult to clarify the ambiguities.
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10. Problems with ambiguously written notes in zhi mode melodies
For more on the ambiguously written notes see Shenpin Zhi Yi. The discussion here uses note names based on considering zhi mode tuning as 2 3 5 6 7 2 3 (see comment). Thus, as an example of difficulties caused by ambiguously written notes, the tablature may indicate that a passage should ascend using 1 sharp then descend using 1 natural; an otherwise apparently similar passage might indicate just the reverse. Without knowing the logic of the difference between these two passages, it is difficult to remember how to play them. Or the tablature might indicate a two step slide (二上) from 6 to 2 without specifically indicating the intermediate step; the inconsistency of usage elsewhere might make it difficult to decide whether the intermediate note should be 7, 1 or 1 sharp.
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11. Determining the scale used in the Saishang Hong of 1589
Standard tuning for the qin is usually considered either as 5 6 1 2 3 5 6 or 1 2 4 5 6 1 2 (1 = do). However, neither of these suggested that the melody had a basis in the standard Chinese pentatonic scale: 1 2 3 5 6: this seems to require that the relative tuning be considered as 2 3 5 6 7 2 3 (D E G a b d e in my transcription). With the tuning considered this way a note count of the first five sections of Saishang Hong yields the following results:
A  109
Bb   0
B   11
C   36
C# 28
D   60
Eb   1
E   85
F     1
F# 11
G  29
G#  2
In this way the melody can be seen as using a basic scale scale of A c d e g (i.e., 6 1 2 3 5), with C often sharped: a "minor pentatonic" version of the standard scale but often switching to "major". The other non-pentatonic notes usually occur on slides, with the two most common not surprisingly connected to the two most common pentatonic notes: B (the note to be "avoided") is usually connected to A, while F sharp (F# / 4#) is usually connected to E. All 14 sections then end on A except the third (E) and the closing coda (A and E together).
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12. Awkward fingering
An example of what I mean here by awkward fingering is a passage that requires the left hand to go up and down on one string when it would be easier to play the melody on two or three strings. Generally I assume the creator of the passage is looking for a special effect, but this is not always certain.
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13. Conflicting instructions
The most common of these is the use of "𠂊" written above a note. Generally this is an abbreviation of "急" ji, which should mean "quickly". However, sometimes an ornament will be added to the note, which would seem to prevent playing it quickly. See also the second note of Section 2, where this figure is written on a harmonic note followed by the direction "省", i.e. "少息", to "pause". This seems to suggest either that "𠂊" has another meaning nowhere defined, or that (perhaps because it is so short and easy to write) it is not uncommonly written unintentially. Regarding a meaning nowhere defined, the most logical would be that it indicates cutting off the sound quickly, i.e., creating a staccato effect. However, this effect would be so dramatic (and generally awkward to accomplish) that it would be very surprising for there to be no related comment or explanation anywhere.
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14. Second handbook: 徽言秘旨 Huiyan Mizhi (1647)
This version, which has no commentary, has 15 sections with no subtitles. An examination of the first three sections shows the melody following the outlines of the 1589 version, but with many of the notes changed, particularly ones that are not pentatonic.
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15. Third handbook: two versions of 1670
The two versions in the 1670 handbook 琴苑新傳全編 Qinyuan Xinchuan Quanbian (1670) can be found in QQJC XI/383 and XI/497.

  1. The first one, with 14 sections, after saying "忌散五絃 avoid the open fifth string", says that its tablature is "據梧堂藏本 based on a volume in the Wutang collection" (last character unclear, but see Zha). Under Section 1 it says, "濟南王譧亨猶龍校 revised by Wang Lianheng Youlong of Ji'nan".
  2. The second one, also 14 sections, is identified in the table of contents (XI/九) as "周本 the Zhou volume", while under the "Section 1" it is again written "濟南王猶龍校 revised by Wang Youlong of Ji'nan".

The two 1670 versions are very different from each other, with the latter one resembling very closely the 1589 version (including the 三退 three step chromatic slide that dramatically appears near the beginning of the 1589 edition).
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16. Fourth handbook: Chengjiantang Qinpu (1689)
This version, reprinted in QQJC XIV/276, uses the new decimal system to indicate finger positions. It has 14 untitled sections, no commentary. The opening multiple note cluster is different but after this it is clearly related to the previous editions, though quite different.
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17. Recording by 吳景略 Wu Jinglue
See 吳景略介紹: it mentions only the reconstruction and the date 1980; no mention of a recording.
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18. Hammond Yong (容克智 Yong Hak-chi)
Hammond's lineage is outlined under Qing Rui(Return)

19. Zheng Yangju 鄭養居
The 1589 edition has no further information other than that Zheng was from 金陵 Jinling (Nanjing); the actual inscription is "金陵鄭養居校傳".
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20. 1609 Preface: Korean connection?
The edition of Yang Lun Taigu Yiyin published in 1609 adds to the above the comment "傳自朝鮮 transmitted from Korea". In 1592 豊臣秀吉 Toyotomi Hideyoshi (see in Wikipedia) had sent Japanese troops into Korea as the beginning of an avowed attempt to conquer China. Chinese troops were then sent to Korea. Many remained stationed there during a truce that lasted until 1597, when the Japanese renewed the attack. More Chinese troops were sent, and casualties were high. The war ended after Hideyoshi's death in 1598. The fact that there is no mention of Korea in the 1589 edition suggests this statement may have been added here simply because Korea was the most important frontier region at the time; in line with this the statement might better be translated as "transmitted by a soldier on the Korean border". See also the further comment on this in the following footnotes.
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21. Commentary in 律話 Lü Hua (1833) concerning Saishang Hong, Korea, and Kun melodies (Wikipedia: Kunqu)
Zha Fuxi (Guide [197] 155) says that the Saishang Hong in Lü Hua uses 無射羽 wuyi yu mode (adding that it has an attached explanation of the tuning method), has 10 sections, 律呂名 the names of notes next to the tablature, and 後附釋文 has commentary afterwards. Since Lü Hua was not reprinted until the 2010 edition of Qinqu Jicheng (XXI/446), I have not yet had time to assess just how closely this version is related to the 1589 version, which has 13 sections and is categorized as using zhi mode. However, based on the following comments, it is clear that this 1833 Saishang Hong still uses standard tuning. And based on the comments above it seems likely that the melody is said to be in a yu mode because it is centered on la - mi; wuyi (which elsewhere suggests a different tuning) perhaps here suggests which note should be considered as do.

On the other hand, that same year (1833) a version of Saishang Hong was also published in Erxiang Qinpu, which was reprinted in facsimile before its inclusion in QQJC (XXIII/163). The mode for this version is called "羽音 yu yin" and it is also in 10 sections, so perhaps it is very similar to the one in Lü Hua (though it does not have the note names). At first glance the first four sections seem roughly similar to 1589, with the same tonal centers but fewer non-pentatonic notes; from the fifth section the melody seems quite different.

The Erxiang Qinpu commentary mentions 腔調 qiangdiao, a term used for mode or melody in opera, perhaps also suggesting a connection to Kunqu. Its entire preface is as follows (tentative translation):

"此曲別開生面。長鎖、滾拂、撥刺、搯撮三聲等指法皆不用。用律謹嚴取音,明淨三十六音皆。閆晴峰云「宏音亮節高唱入雲」此八字形容腔調如聞三十六聲。
This melody breaks new ground. It does not use such (clusters indicating multiple stroke) finger techniques as changsuo, gunfu, boci and tao cuo san sheng. In using the notes one (must) precisely bring out the tones, making bright and clear the 36 pitches. Yan Qingfeng said, 'Grand sounds clear beats high singing enters clouds': these eight words describe a qiangdiao that is like listening to 36 sounds."

Note that, of the clusters that indicate multiple stroke finger techniques described above, 1589 has one, a changsuo. Regarding 閆晴峰 Yan Qingfeng, 晴峰 is a nickname and 閆 is 閻, but I can find only a 闕嵐號晴峰 42373.44 Que Lan nickname Qingfeng, a painter. I have not found a reference to 36 pitches or sounds. The significance of mentioning multiple stroke clusters could be that such clusters make a qin melody less suitable for use as a vocal melody if one must put them together according to the traditional pairing method.

The Lü Hua commentary is particularly interesting for its comments on Kunqu, in particular mentioning one of its apparent founders, Wei Liangfu (魏良輔, 1501-84; Bio/2575). According to ICTCL, pp.514/5, Wei "played an important part in the development" of Kunqu. Though "not a composer in the modern Western sense", he blended different regional forms to create an opera style that quickly became very popular, including with the literati, and also wrote several important treatises including 曲律 Rules for Kunqu Tunes.

It is against this background that the melody Saishang Hong emerges (see comment on its source). Although I have not yet found the name "Saishang Hong" in any Kunqu context, it does not seem impossible that a qin melody that was created or evolved in the latter part of the 16th century might in some way follow a Kunqu style. The specific connection made in 1833 seems on the face of it quite fantastic: since the melody had changed quite a bit by 1833, and in any case there is virtually nothing known about the earliest Kunqu melodies, it would be very difficult to find specific connections. Nevertheless, the point seems important enough that one should try to do some research in this area.

The 1833 article seems to suggest that qin players would not wish to admit this connection, perhaps because opera was a part of popular culture, so they made up the connection with Korea. The article then makes some comparisons between the actual qin melody and Kunqu melodies. In this regard it should be noted that Kun style singing puts many notes on each syllable while qin songs generally have one note for each syllable (ornaments occasionally add more). However, because Saishang Hong never had lyrics, any connection can only be seen through the melody.

The Guide's quotation of the Lü Hua afterword (Guide [477] 233) is incomplete (see XXI/451-3). It indicates omitted parts by ........, and puts into smaller type text which in the original has two lines per column.

As quoted in the Guide the Lü Hua afterword goes as follows (it begins using standard size print),

律話:塞上鴻一曲,楊掄載於伯牙心法篇內。其序云,"按斯曲,蓋傷戎邊而作也。"........下注云,金陵鄭養居校傳自朝鮮
"Lü Hua: The melody Saishang Hong was written down by Yang Lun in Boya Xinfa. Its preface says, It is thought that this melody was written as a lament on the barbarian border regions .........Below this there is a comment saying, Revised by Zheng Yangju of Jinling and transmitted from Korea."

Next comes the following in smaller print:

"按鴈門紫塞,征人懷鄉,中華戎邊,歷代不免。而朝鮮一國,遠在海島,與鴈門絕無干涉(relation),何以亦作是曲?此琴家以為得自異城,欲神奇其譜,故有傳自朝鮮之說,內有疑竇數則,列載於後﹕"
(not yet translated)

After this the full size print continues as follows. It discusses three of the above-mentioned "疑竇 yidou" (causes for suspicion) and mentions the qin techniques 掐撮 qiacuo (usually 掐撮三聲 qiacuo sansheng), 滾輔 gunfu, 撥刺 boci and 雙彈 shuangtan, all quite common but none used in Saishang Hong.

......具崑腔之體例,此其疑竇一也...... 以入聲分居三韻,此填北曲者之所宗,今此操自入促彈,上部八段九段,皆用大指掐用中指(用大、中指掐撮?);此正是上平入三聲之法。惟出促十徽,方用食指,此其疑竇二也。...... 昆腔家用笙笛合絃索之法。蓋滚拂、撥刺、雙彈伏,笙笛中無此音,在琴家最有關係,而此操一概不用,此其疑竇三也。......
"....It has the stylistic rules and layout of Kun melodies (my emphasis); this is the first cause for suspicion.... It has entering tones divided into three (translation incomplete)....

當是魏良輔一流人物,以昆腔之法,作塞上鴻之琴操也。況嘉、隆之後,萬曆繼統,正楊掄刻伯牙心法之際,而琴中不用掐撮等音,恐招物議,故嫁用名於朝鮮耳。
"At that time someone in the style of Wei Liangfu (魏良輔, 1501-84; Bio/2575; ICTCL/514: "played an important part in the development" of Kunqu and wrote 曲律 Rules for Kunqu Tunes) used the method of Kun melodies to write the qin melody Saishang Hong. Furthermore, after the Jiajing [1522-67] and Longqing [1567-73] emperors, Wan Li [1573-1620] continued the rule, just then Yang Lun published Boya Xinfa, and on the qin did not use such sounds as qiacuo (same as the tao cuo mentioned above). Fearing that this would attract widespread criticism, he falsely used the name of Korea."

Earlier this lengthy commentary had made comparisons between qin techniques and the Kun melody style. As yet I have not yet carefully examined the Lü Hua tablature, so I do not yet know to what extent (as with the 1589 Saishang Hong tablature discussed above) it avoids clusters that indicate multiple stroke fingering technique such as qiacuo (except for one chang suo).
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22. See the previous footnote as well as the commentary under opera.
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23. Original Preface
The original preface from 1589 is as follows:

按斯曲,蓋傷戎邊而作也。彼黃雲秋塞,千里肅條,極目煙塵,西風砭骨;景物淒涼,于斯極矣。顧瞻鴻鴈,翱翔于青霄之上。嘹嚦于紫塞之鄉;聲嘹嚦而語哀哀,「王事靡鹽,不遑歸處」。感懷者,倍為腸斷;聞之者,涕淚交頤。是曲聲律慘悽,音韻悲傷,為出一段征人懷鄉憂國之音,真虞絃中之白眉者也。同志者細聽察焉。

"王事靡鹽,不遑歸處。" is a variant of lines found in at least three entries in the 詩經 Book of Songs

#121: "王事靡鹽,不能蓺稷黍。", "王事靡鹽,不能蓺黍稷。", "王事靡鹽,不能蓺稻梁。";
#162: "王事靡鹽,不遑啟處。", "王事靡鹽,不遑將父。", and "王事靡鹽,不遑將母。";
#167: "王事靡鹽,不遑啟處。".

As here they all begin (Waley), "The king's business never ends, (so) I have no time to ...."
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24. Music
I have not yet recorded my reconstruction.
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Appendix: Chart Tracing 塞上鴻 Saishang Hong
Based mainly on Zha Fuxi's
Guide, 29/232/--; none of the handbooks has lyrics or section titles (further comments above)

      琴譜
    (year; QQJC Vol/page)
Further information
(QQJC = 琴曲集成 Qinqu Jicheng; QF = 琴府 Qin Fu)
01 真傳正宗琴譜
      (1589; VII/169)
14+1 sections; zhi mode; the present version, reprinted 1609
Has some unique modal characteristics
02. 徽言秘旨
      (1647; X/175)
15; zhi
 
02.a 徽言秘旨訂
      (1692; fac/???)
Copy of previous
 
03.a 琴苑新傳全編
      (1670; XI/391)
14; zhi diao; "忌散五絃 avoid the open 5th string" (comment)
 
03.b 琴苑新傳全編
      (1670; XI/505)
14+1; zhi diao; "濟南王猶龍校譜 tablature corrected by Wang Youlong of Jinan"
"周本 Zhou volume"; seems mostly to follow 1589
04. 澄鑒堂琴譜
      (1689; XIV/282)
14+1; zhi yin
 
05. 蓼懷堂琴譜
      (1702; XIII/261)
12+1; zhi yin
 
06. 誠一堂琴譜
      (1705; XIII/373)
14; zhi yin
 
07. 五知齋琴譜
      (1722; XIV/499)
16+1; zhi yin; preface mostly repeats 1589, the author adding that he obtained it in 1669 from the Chunyi Hall (Chunyi Zhai: 純一齋. 27915.1 Chunyi: nickname for 金淑 Jin Shu and 杜立德 Du Lide), but it was in very bad condition; after considerable study he made his own version. The afterword has some comments on the melody itself.
08. 存古堂琴譜
      (1726; XV/263)
16+1; zhi yin
 
09. 琴書千古
      (1738; XV/418)
16+1; zhi yin
 
10. 春草堂琴譜
      (1744; XVIII/284)
10; yu yin but "即用中呂中呂均彈 play with zhonglü jun"
Still related
11. 琴劍合譜
      (1749; XVIII/326)
13; zhi yin
 
12. 穎陽琴譜
      (1751; XVI/99)
14+1; zhi yin;
 
13a. 蘭田館琴譜
      (1755; XVI/244)
12; zhi yin; 北塞上鴻 Bei Saishang Hong, a related melody found only here
(Afterword; see also next)
13b. 蘭田館琴譜
      (1760; XVI/247)
13; zhi yin; 南塞上鴻 Nan Saishang Hong; a related melody found only here
(Afterword; see also previous)
14. 琴香堂琴譜
      (1760; XVII/82)
10+1; zhi yin
 
15. 研露樓琴譜
      (1766; XVI/471)
16+1; zhi yin; "即霜鴻引,明妃作 same as Shuanghong Yin by Ming Fei" (Wang Zhaojun); preface mentions Huangyun Qiu Sai
16. 自遠堂琴譜
      (1802; XVII/417)
16+1; shang yin
still related; seems to begin with a double stop
17. 裛露軒琴譜
      (>1802; XIX/295)
16+1; zhi yin
"光裕堂譜 Guangyu Hall tablature"  
18. 琴譜諧聲
      (1820; XX/197)
10; 變徴調 bianzhi diao (standard tuning)
 
19. 峰抱樓琴譜
      (1825; XX/336)
10; yu yin
 
20. 鄰鶴齋琴譜
      (1830; XXI/55)
10; mode not indicated; still related
 
21. 二香琴譜
      (1833; XXIII/163)
10+1; yu yin; afterword comments on the tablature
 
22. 律話
      (1833; XXI/446)
10+1; 無射羽 wuyi yu; writes in note names; most detailed commentary (q.v.) including commentary with each section and an afterword that mentions the 1589 version; still related
23. 悟雪山房琴譜
      (1836; XXII/417)
11; 無射均, 羽音, 用中呂均彈 "but don't tighten 5th string". This handbook is connected to the Lingnan school; its tablature here is for music quite similar to that in the recording by Hammond Yung, but see also 1870
24. 張鞠田琴譜
      (1844; XXIII/326)
16+1; zhi diao, yu yin;
begins with double stop
25. 稚雲琴譜
      (1849; XXIII/361)
10+1; yu yin
 
26. 蕉庵琴譜
      (1868; XXVI/67)
16; shang yin; also "無射均, 羽音, 用中呂均彈, 不緊五絃 (don't tighten 5th string)"
commentary
27. 琴瑟合譜
      (1870; XXVI/179)
10; mode note indicated (also in 琴府 Qin Fu); tablature for se paired with qin;
Hammond Yong's YouTube recording is from here but without the se
28. 以六正五之齋琴xue秘書
      (1875; XXVI/242)
16+1; zhi yin; begins with double stop; commentary compares to Huangyun Qiu Sai
 
29. 天聞閣琴譜
      (1876; XXV/438)
10+1; yu yin, shang diao ("= 1849")
 
30. 響雪齋琴譜
      (1876; ???)
Originally part of 1807?
cannot find, but Zha Guide p.(221) 179 says 13 sections, zhi yin
31. 希韶閣琴譜
      (1878; XXVI/368)
10; 變徴 bianzhi (standard tuning)
compare 1820
32. 枯木禪琴譜
      (1893; XXVIII/85)
16; 變徴音 bianzhi yin (standard tuning)
"漢蘇武所作 by Su Wu"
33. 詩夢齋琴譜
      (1914)
 not indexed and not in Qinqu Jicheng
 

 
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