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QSCB : Sui Tang    /     previous     next 網站目錄
Chapter Five: Sui and Tang dynasties 1
Xu Jian, Introductory History of the Qin, p.75 2
第五章﹕隋唐
許健﹕琴史初編,第75頁
Part Two (Qin melodies) :

7. Yuge Diao

The lyrics come from The Old Fisherman (Yu Weng), a poem by Liu Zhongyuan (AD 773-819). Liu Zhongyuan's materialistic ideology and his prose were actively influential during the Tang dynasty. His short poem illustrates scenery through imagery in its short form and is very invigorating. The poem Yu Weng, through the variation in scenery before and after sunrise, expresses the carefree mood of the fisherman in nature. Its melody, found in various handbooks from the Ming and Qing dynasties, is called Yu Ge Diao, Ji Le Yin (or Le Ji Yin). It is often used as the prelude to a larger-scale melody with the same theme, such as Ao Ai (also pronounced Ai Nai, and in earlier handbooks also called Yu Ge). The notes of Yu Ge Diao are melodious and pleasant, reflecting the mood of the original poem. The song goes like this:

(Staff notation example not yet online4)

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Footnotes (Shorthand references are explained on a separate page)

1. See footnote to the preface for details of the period covered (589 - 979).
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2. Initial translation by Jin Qiuyu
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4. Xu Jian's transcription is from the version in Mei'an Qinpu (1931), which seems to be musically unrelated to any of the earlier versions. In addition, his transcription uses standard tuning instead of raised fifth string, so there are a number of mistakes. Thus its only connection to the Tang dynasty would seem to be its lyrics.
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